Leading Australian bridal giant, Grace Loves Lace, is ready to launch its new eco wedding dress on the sweetest day of the year, Valentine's day.

Published in Fashion

The choices are endless when it comes to vegan and sustainable fashion. Whether you are looking for a cool slogan t-shirt, cruelty-free faux-leather shoes, or a stylish dress to leave everyone speechless at the next gala dinner there are plenty of fashion brands to choose from.

Sustainable fashion labels. Ph. Ksenia Chernaya, PexelsPh. Ksenia Chernaya, Pexels

You can easily keep up with the latest fashion trends or find the one-of-a-kind garment made just for you thanks to all the sustainable and vegan fashion brands out there.


Nowadays sustainable fashion is not something new or rare, yet everyone seems to think it is very hard to find. The proof: here are some brands to have on your list for sustainable fashion.

Birdsong

Birdsong - Dress in Protest Source: Birdsong

More than just an ethical and sustainable fashion brand, Birdsong is a social enterprise. A brand that wishes to revolutionise the way we produce and consume fashion. The slogan 'dress in protest' is meant to raise awareness of the fast pace of the fashion industry and the desire to follow trends. Birdsong designs clothes for remarkable women, but are also designed by remarkable women. The fabrics used are either ethical, sustainable or reclaimed alongside the use of eco dyes. It is all about finding that unique garment that makes you feel empowered. Their collection is unlike anything you will find on the high street: "it’s about thoughtful clothes in bright colours, edgy silhouettes and original prints made from natural fabrics."

Fanfare

Fanfare, ethical and sustainable fashion brandSource: Fanfare

The brand is built on the foundation of ethics and sustainability. Their goal is to popularise circularity in the fashion industry and change the way people buy, wear and consume clothing. With upcycling at the heart of the label’s philosophy, the Fanfare team manages to transform vintage pieces into contemporary designs by repurposing existing materials through various textile cutting techniques. In addition to being entirely plastic-free, Fanfare is made from sustainable materials and is certified by OEKO-TEX and GOTS.

“Our hope for the future is that we can change the world around us and become a catalyst towards powerful social good and new models of consumption.”

Lucy & Yak

Lucy & Yak, environmentally friendly and ethical fashionSource: Lucy & Yak

Lucy & Yak is an independent, ethical, and sustainably made brand, committed to preserving the environment and society. Every item, from boilersuits to colourful dungarees to cropped sweatshirts, is made with organic fabrics and manufactured in their factory in North India, where workers receive four times the minimum wage for the state. They use 100% recycled and biodegradable postage material and stationery to distribute their products. And if that was not enough to get you hooked on the brand let me tell you that they also have a Depop shop. To ensure all stock gets sold and demonstrate that sustainable clothing can be affordable, any flawed piece is advertised at a discounted price on Depop.

Indigo Luna

Indigo Luna, environmentally friendly and ethical fashionSource: Indigo Luna

A small family-run brand focused on producing good quality products created using eco-consciousness and sustainable manufacturing practices. A yoga and swimwear line, Indigo Luna is handmade in Bali by women-owned and operated factories. Using natural fabrics and natural dyeing techniques, the rich, earthy colours come from various plant materials such as indigo leaves, mango leaves, Indian almond leaves and Indian redwood bark. Be sure to keep yourself updated with the brands newest addition, because their collections are purposely created in small, sustainable runs so they can run out of stock and avoid wasting any materials.

Ninety Percent

Ninety Percent, sustainable fashion supporting charitiesSource: Ninety Percent

Can you guess where the name might come from? Ninety Percent is a London-based sustainable womenswear label that shares 90% of its profit between charitable causes. With the purchase of their products, the brand asks its customers to pick which charity they would like to support. The pioneering business model, Ninety Percent has created, strives to have a different approach to the fashion industry. Their collection includes a variety of luxury basics that elevate the everyday, such as well-cut organic cotton sweats, detailed jersey staples and comfortable tops made from soft TENCEL.

“We don’t believe in short-lived trends and hope that once you have finished with your Ninety Percent garment you’ll pass it on for somebody else to love, too”

Have you fallen in love with the world of sustainable fashion? There sure is a lot to fall in love with. From the colourful and bold garments to the minimalistic and sophisticated high street-like collections. They all share the same mission: to be good for you and good for the planet.

Published in Blog
Friday, 04 February 2022 09:41

A NA-KD-clear Example of Climate Action

Pollution and climate change is the hefty bill planet Earth pays for our wardrobes. Thanks to the example of sustainable fashion brands like NA-KD, we know that a global action plan is possible.

 Fashion climate action. Ph. hello i m nik, UnsplashPh. hello i m nik, Unsplash

Multi-tasking and multi-targeting, this is the climate action plan set and run by NA-KD. The daunting mission has many green goals and it is still achievable.

 

Fashion And The Environment: The Facts

The changes experienced by the environment are tangible and, most of all, global. The public attention is all on the main actor in today's climate disruption: fashion – or better – fast fashion.

With the trends coming and going and the pressure to follow them, fast fashion has provided the mass with an endless variety of always fresh clothing at reasonable prices. The price tag might be low, but the consequences on the ecosystem proved not to be so light and for many different reasons.

From a consumer point of view, the fast-fashion temptation led to more purchases which indirectly lowers down the life span of our clothing and causes more textile waste. Numbers clarify the state of facts: in Europe1, for example, people buy 26Kg of new clothing and discard an impressive 11Kg every year. Sales have been increasing by 40% since 1996 but, on the other hand, the EU fashion industry has not been able to keep up with fabric refuses as just 1% of the textiles was recycled for clothing due to technological issues.

If we are guilty of overconsumption, many brands lack sustainability in their production. Indeed, every step in fashion manufacture can be deemed responsible for greenhouse emissions, water pollution and land degradation. To break down the process, these phases are sourcing new raw materials, processing and producing new clothing, packing and shipping goods. As we will see shortly, NA-KD focuses on each one in its ecological journey toward a climate-neutral production by 2025.

Cotton productio and environmental issue. Ph. Crsten Vollrath, PexelsPh. Crsten Vollrath, Pexels

Present on the shelves for 24%, cotton is a very common natural fibre in this industry, yet it is the least sustainable material. Its production involves considerable consumption of water for irrigation and land: alone, 1Kg of cotton needs between 10,000 and 30,000 litres of water depending on the geographical region2. 1 cotton t-shirt equals 2,500 litres of water!

Furthermore, the remaining water sources are polluted by pesticides and insecticides employed in cotton cultivation, dyes and chemicals from clothing and jeans processing, and microfibres. Although small, microparticles, in the long run, pollute water basins and oceans ending up putting marine fauna at severe risk. 0,5 million tonnes of plastic microfibres – that is 35% released in the environment – come from washing synthetic clothes. Again, one straightforward example taken from daily life will wake you up: 1 laundry of polyester clothing creates 700,000 microplastics3 going down the water pipes.

Microplastics found in Mirissa Harbour, Sri Lanka. Ph. Soren Funk, UnsplashMicroplastics found in Mirissa Harbour, Sri Lanka. Ph. Soren Funk, Unsplash

Even before we can put our hands on some brand-new clothing, more pollution comes along. Bringing fashion goods to distribution sites all over the globe translates to material waste and CO2 emissions through packing and shipping. In total, on the shoulder of the fashion industry, there is 10% of the global carbon emissions. The analysis run by McKinsey states that the amount reached 2.1 billion metric tonnes of greenhouse gases in 2018, foreseen to jump to 2.7 billion metric tonnes by 2030 with no drastic changes are taken.

The NA-KD Green Example

NA-KD eco-friendly plan and circularity modelNA-KD Reborn, a collection made of more sustainable materials

Switching to a greener production may seem an epic deed. Indeed, it is not easy and requires a multi-tasking approach. NA-KD carbon-neutral journey is an example we wish many companies will study and copy for the future. But what is so special about it?

The difficulties lie in the disparate production phases and the many actors involved from start to end: suppliers, brands, delivery companies, retailers and, finally, consumers. NA-KD's plan tackles every source of pollution and liaises with all the entities working in the industry and/or involved.

The brand, born in 2016, is now distributed in 50 different countries, no wonder NA-KD feels the urge to act for the better. The label launched its first sustainable line in 2019 and, by 20254, it aims to:
• halve CO2 emission per product,
• use 100% sustainable materials,
• climate-compensate shipping (by investing in wind power),
• stop any non-sustainable production by 2025,
• reuse or recycle 100% of packaging material by 2025,
• reach a completely transparent supply chain (for 80% of the production),
• fund sustainable initiatives

To reduce its footprint, NA-KD has switched to renewable energy and studied to reduce its carbon footprint caused by transport, while supporting its partner to change for renewable alternatives, have better use of water and more efficient treatment of chemicals. The brand's focus moves then to materials. The first goal was to use 100% more sustainable cotton for its denim by 2022 and have all products made in sustainable materials by 2025. To make this possible, NA-KD informed its purchasing department to make sensible choices; looked for organic and recycled cotton; implemented its certificates, and found new suppliers sharing the same eco-commitments. Having a transparent supply chain and clear communication with the public about sustainability and production are part of this green journey, as well as good practices for every business.

After tackling the problem connected with sourcing, manufacturing and distribution, NA-KD took care of the last but equally important piece in this puzzle: you, the consumer. Fashion consumers feel every day more conscious about the environment and the active role they play through their decisions. The brand's call to action emphasises the love for clothing: how to take care of them and so prolong their life and quality. The #SoMe campaign wants to accompany you through an educational journey, at the end of which you will adopt sustainable behaviours.

Loving your outfits, at some point, will bring you to pass this love onto someone else. NA-KD circular program supports the circularity models by rewarding you with a discount for every return piece of clothing. While you can give back, you can find new discoveries in the pre-loved marketplace section on the NA-KD website.

Although hard and ambitious, climate action is achievable in the fashion industry. The NA-KD plan shows this is a matter of organisation, time, strong commitments and collaboration. Only when all parties will weigh their actions and understand the right things to do, fashion will be finally greener and we hope soon.

Read more about NA-KD’s sustainability commitment and discover its sustainable and pre-love ranges online.

Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4.

Published in Blog
Sunday, 05 December 2021 09:54

BLUE M Collection - La Chafrave

Launching a fashion label does not feel complete without a public presentation; this has been the reality for many in the industry during the pandemic. The time to resume is now. After the standby forced by the pandemic, BLEU M can finally present its inaugural fashion show, 'La Chafrave'.

Published in Fashion

A brand-new partnership introduces circular and more transparent solutions to implement sustainability in fashion retail. EVRYTHNG and Re-Fashion collaborate with New Look to make a change happen.

Published in Fashion

Redress and VF Corporation, parent house of Kipling®, collaborated again after the success of the Redress Design Award 2019 Made For Change Challenge in Hong Kong. The first competition amongst Redress Alumni aimed to find the designer for a sustainable collection based on circular design principles and using VF Corporation deadstock, end-of-roll fabrics, or innovative recycled fabrics. The winning design had the privilege to become a limited-edition capsule collection retail exclusively in Kipling stores from November 15th, 2021 across APAC. 

Published in Fashion
Friday, 08 October 2021 13:38

Lemuel MC, the sustainable beauty of linen

A cool breeze on bare skin in summer, a warm hug in winter. Linen is the fabric chosen by Marta Cernovskaja for her brand Lemuel MC with sustainability and transparency at its core.

Published in Fashion

Second Hand September made its appearance on the catwalk of the London Fashion Week with fashion's rising star Harris Reed showcasing his unique collection made with Oxfam clothing. 

Published in Fashion

The '70s are back! An era full of glam, disco, Bowie, Jagger, bell bottoms, bold prints, crochet, dagger collar blouses and so much more. '70s style pieces are full-fledged on again. So, stock up your autumn wardrobe with these five essentials that should not be missed in anyone’s closet this autumn season.

'70s vinatge fashion. Essentials for A/W wardrobe. Ph. Julian Myles, UnsplashPh. Julian Myles, Unsplash

'70s kaleidoscopic style is the hottest fashion trend on Instagram, a good source of inspiration to make vintage looks truly yours. Perfect vibes for the upcoming autumn season, these are our 5 essentials for your wardrobe.


Retro aesthetics of the ‘70s are taking over our social media pages, and surely we all know what this era’s fashion stands for, right? You may have a lot of associations but read on to find out how you can also adapt those to contemporary trends.

Penny Lane Coats

Penny Lane coats. '70s vintsge fashion essentials. Credits @hannahlouisefA black & white example embellished with silver star and moon stitching, seen on influencer @hannahlouisef.

Showcased on everyone’s Instagram feed at the moment, contemporary brands like House of Sunny and Saks Pott brought about the resurgence of an absolute classic, the Penny Lane coat. Not only do they look fabulous, but also keep you warm and cosy throughout those stormy autumn days about to be faced. Simultaneously, these statement piece coats are spreading huge ‘Almost Famous’ vibes, whose character of Penny Lane is where its name originally stems from.

Formerly better known as Afghan coats, the style was brought into mainstream fashion mainly by celebrities, especially musicians like The Beatles and Jimi Hendrix throughout the late '60s and early '70s, which created all the associations it has with Rock n’ Roll nowadays. Available in plain suede or embellished with stitching and embroidery, they add an effortlessly chic twist to even the most basic outfit, a real no-brainer. Penny Lane coats are here to stay!

Funky Prints

Funky prints. '70s vintage fashion essentials. Credits @mounakaeLondon-based influencer @mounakae effortlessly sports a '70s-inspired swirl patterned set. The halter neck top adds to an overall retro atmosphere.

Battle the upcoming gloomy autumn days with ever more vibrant colours and funky prints. They appear in numerous forms and can be incorporated through basically every form of clothing. No matter if it is a top, blouse, trousers, skirt, jacket, or if you do not want to go all the way simply add a colourful headband or scarf. Chevron and flame stitch, argyle, paisley, swirls, zebra, floral and abstract geometric patterns are just a few infamous '70s patterns to be named. All were influenced by folk and psychedelic rock of the era. Matching sets are an easy way to pull off a nice fit without much effort. Bright colours and bold patterns can complement each other or clash in an offbeat way. This season there is no such thing as too radiant or vibrant. Multi-coloured clothes all the way, it is about mixing and matching, so be bold.

Flared Trousers

Flared trousers. '70s vintage fashion. Credits @hannahlouisef@hannahlouisef wears a classic denim flare with a middle line seam.

First popularised by Cher and Sonny in the mid-'60s, flared trousers became a staple piece of the era, and are interconnected with the counterculture hippie movement.

They are extremely versatile and can be styled in either '70s Americana style, feminine chic, androgynous with a pantsuit, or in a glam rock/disco manner for those nights out and about. Extra points if they are corduroy or in flower print, for the ultimate retro style. A more classic approach would be a pair of simple blue denim in true Farrah Fawcett manner, worn with a colourful top and white trainers. The choice of fabric is key here, they are available in either denim, cotton, corduroy, or polyester and vary in terms of how wide they flare at the bottom and whether they have an additional split hem. One thing is for certain, every kind of flared trousers will give legs for days since the shape is known to elongate the silhouette.

Platform Boots

Platform boots. '70s vintage fashion essentials. Credits letsgetflashy, Ph. Alexandre Alaux@letsgetflashy goes all in with a Bowie-esque approach on colour coordinating platform boots, perfectly fitting her ginger mullet. (Ph. Alexandre Alaux)

The '70s surely were an innovative decade for fashion, as the clothing represented youths newly found carefree mentality and desire to deviate from their parents' generation’s norms regarding outward appearances and attire. The way they dressed was an act of rebellion in itself. Platform boots were mainly popularised by glam rock performers like Elton John, the New York Dolls, and especially David Bowie during his alter ego Ziggy Stardust phase. This made the trend gender-neutral, since Bowie incorporated various queering elements in his stage performances and photoshoots, so a lot of men adopted this element and could be spotted wearing heels.

Due to being considered the era’s disco shoe, the connection to present events seems fitting. Now that clubs have reopened after long months of social distancing, expressing a newfound sense of liberty is once again expressed through head-turning clothes. Online shops frequently advertise new 'going out wear' with phrases and puns referencing a need for customers to prepare for their comeback to the club floors with fitting party outfits, predominantly targeting teens and 20-somethings. Just like the trend was originally about catching attention, the intention remains the same. On a side note, the shoes are particularly petite friendly and can add a good few inches of height, while also keeping your feet dry when stomping through those leaf-covered parks and forests once foliage hits the ground.

Bulky Square-shaped Tinted Sunglasses

Bulky square-shaped sunglasses. '70s vintage essentials. Credits @annacascarina@annacascarina stuns in a simple, yet eye-catching black-framed model with yellow/orange-tinted glasses, which harmonizes very well with her floral printed Resume blouse.

A drastic opposition to the previous tiny sunglasses trend, originally stemming from the '90s. Now the motto certainly is 'the bigger the better!'.

Don’t shy away from colourful tinted glasses to give your fit this extra pop of colour. Particularly popular now are blue, yellow, amber, and red-tinted glasses with a tortoiseshell look frame. A perfect companion when having to hide nasty dark under-eye circles or puffy eyes in the morning.

Where To Get The Look?

It is apparent that these trends are interconnected in cultural significance, socio-political influence, and historical context. A feeling of exuberance seems to be around, which is expressed and underlined through fashion.

Though all items are in some form currently available at the established high street fashion houses, we recommend you take a look at your local thrift store or browse online through secondhand apps like Vinted, Depop, and Etsy to find a truly unique and long-lasting piece of clothing with an attached history. Not only is the quality of fabric and construction usually higher, but buying used clothes contributes to more conscious and sustainable consumption, therefore helping to protect our planet and spreading awareness. If these options do not fit size-wise, upcycling in DIY, or bringing it to a local tailor can easily fix any issue and simultaneously make it more distinctive and individual. Fashion cycles have always existed and will continue to do so, however, now with constant online access to fast-fashion retailers they are speeding up more and more. Nevertheless, the aforementioned trends are certainly not fleeting or just adaptable for this season, because true vintage never goes out of style.

Published in Blog
Tuesday, 14 September 2021 11:40

Redress Design Award 2021 has its winner

Redress Design Award 2021, the world's largest competition on sustainable fashion design, has finally its winner. The news has been announced live-streamed from Hong Kong after a hybrid Grand Final fashion show with real and virtual models.

Published in News
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