I know I keep apologising for not doing a regular blog but believe it or not I am so busy at the moment that even finding time to breathe has been just so difficult, I can only thank God that I am still alive as really I should have ran out of air by now.

Please excuse my manners, I should have started by saying Happy Easter to you and I hope you are having a lovely holiday.

There is soooooo much to talk about but I decided that for this blog I will only mention one topic and I wish to seek your views or comments. I don't care where you leave them, but just leave them on the blog, Facebook, Twitter, graffiti, on a banner etc I think you get the point.

BACKGROUND:

In Lagos Nigeria on the 19th April we had a model casting to select models for two big shows, Africa Fashion Week Nigeria (AFWN) and Nigerian Student Fashion & Design Week (NSFDW). For AFWN we needed 12 Female models and 3 Male models and for NSFDW we needed 22 female models and 8 male models.

On the day we had over 500 models show up with about another 300 turned away cos they were late. We had two separate panels, one for AFWN which consisted of the CEO of Shuga Kane Bili and whom was also a former Mahogany Model, the assistant stylist for AFWN - Bimbo and the head stylist for AFWN – Jide. For NSFDW the panel consisted of the co founders of NSFDW Abiola & Marcus and the head stylist for AFWN – Jide. But it must be said that both sets of panels worked together and gave their views for either show. I remained as a neutral arbitrator and ensured that I got the good mix of models that I wanted in the show, which included overruling some of the panel members when I needed to. (but very rarely did).

2015 08 10 1830

THE ISSUE:

I wake up early Sunday morning to find a BB message from one of the models that attended the casting and this is what it said (UNEDITED);

Good morning Mr Mahogany, I am so sorry to disturb u on this issue, but because of the previous relationship I have had with u I was compelled to let u know, well yesterday some things were noticed by one of ur judging staff that was placed among three to select models, I won't call his name but I am very sure u know who I am talking about, this guy among two other lady's was were d ones judging and instead of being professional in selecting models, he was ensuring all his friends/boyfriends were chosen at the expense of what the two other female judges wanted. I find this appalling mr sola, I can only tell u dis because ur a professional and I respect you, the sentimental selection that was done by that guy was too much, it was clear and evident from all models dat that's what he was doing and for some strange reason he had a major influence on the other two female judges despite their own desires to select what dey felt was best.

Mr sola I say this with Humility I felt insulted to have been chosen as stanby/maybe in the presence of those 3 that we're chosen as Yes, judging by my walk and appearance to me it was laughable, despite the the fact that the two females were penchant on picking me first as Yes, they were compelled by the other male judge's sentimental plea to pick his friends over me and another who was placed as maybe. Now mr sola why I am sending u dis is not to change ur decision on anything but let u have a knowledge of what I and others saw yesterday, it was so bad dat a few of ur staff noticed it. I say this to u sir, the only free show I have done in my career is the show I did for u last year (NSFDW), a show I was compelled to do because of the professional structure u gave it, I did it for free despite u said a few from der will be chosen paid for dis show. I am not saying I am too big to a show for free for u, but I cant do a show wit those models selected as priority on pay list with me in standby unpaid, to me that is an insult and all who know me will be astonished.

2015 08 10 1830

Left to me I can do both shows free for u, but me being put on standby side by side with those 3 selected as Yes out of which 2 were placed der on the sentimental decision of them being boyfriends to a male judge there is a shocker to me. the two female judges overtly said my walk was better that the chosen Yes and I was told not to worry, but I still worry because the truth is if this doesn't stop in Nigeria we won't go anywhere in dis fashion industry, models on the runway are the prime reflection of the quality of any show and if weak models are being chosen on sentimental basis then I feel sad for our industry. I respect you sir and I am ready to for u anytime, anywhere, but I just had to tell u this.

THE DILEMMA:

Out of respect for how he wrote the BB I decided that I would omit his name from the blog. I have responded to him privately, but I wanted to put some questions to you my enlightened readers.

1. Based on the facts above does he have a point or is it sour grapes?
2. Based on the BBM should I still let him do the show if he wants to or remove him?
3. Are the accusations easy to verify and prove bearing in mind we only wanted 3 male models, and he was one of 2 additional male models that was put on standby and it must be noted that over 180 other male models were not chosen, so can they make the same accusation against us?
4. As the head stylist (second in command to me) and as the head of the two judging panels, is it wrong (if it is the case) for him to say certain models should be selected?
5. Does it mean that I and the other two panel members were forced into this by the head stylist (please note that Bili is a very very strong woman whom has her strong views on anything and is no pushover)?
6. If I did not manage it well, what should I do next time to ensure that these types of accusations cannot be levelled against a casting that I do again in the future?
7. Any other comments that you may have?

I know you want to know how I responded and what my views are but I want to see what you all feel about it first before responding.

I can't wait for your responses and as always I expect you to be honest in your views, no holding back the punches.

Published in Blog
Tuesday, 17 September 2013 02:05

Why won't racism go away?

For me fashion week is over after doing two fantastic days of shows at our brand new venue at the Grand Connaught Rooms in the very heart of the fashion week homeland, but sadly the saga of the failure to use models of colour on the catwalks has not gone away despite the fact that this is 2013 and we live in one of the most multi cultural cities in the world.
racism 1

I happened to be on the tube train, yes I did take public transport – sadly, no car to drive as I am just visiting and I just did not feel like hiring a car and then having to pay congestion charges and have nowhere to park it – what a city. As I was saying before I rudely interrupted myself, I was on the train and someone left behind a copy of the Evening Standard and as I had a long cold ride on the tube I decided to flick through it and have a read and I came across an interesting article on page 20/21 entitled "Where are all the black models on our catwalks?".

racism 2

In brief Iman, Naomi Campbell and Bethann Hardison have teamed up to launch a campaign to combat fashions 'virtual white-out". It is a sad state of affairs when she states there were more models of colour used in the 70's when racism was rift then now in 2013. An in depth research was done across all four of the big fashion weeks (London, Paris, Milan and New York) and only 6% of the total models used were models of colour.

HERE WHAT NAOMI CAMPBELL HAD TO SAY ABOUT IT ON SKY NEWS

The figures above do not surprise me in anyway whatsoever and I could have saved them money by not paying to do the research as you can see that models of colour are not being used anywhere. Similar to when I did the Italia Vogue All Black Issue it was simply about having the necessary facts needed to back up their arguments. I love Iman as she shoots straight from the hip and says it is blatant racism.

The coalition goes on to list the designers and fashion houses they say are "guilty of this racist act" and I can't say you would be surprised at the names listed which include, Calvin Klein, Donna Karan, Chanel, Armani, Gucci, Saint Laurent, Victoria Beckham ( sorry I have to add an extra comment here but to me from time she allegedly looks like a racist – I apologise to any Victoria Beckham fans that I have offended), Roberto Cavalli and Marc by Marc Jacobs.

The above is a very impressive list, one that I would not want to be a part of. I will come back to all of this later but I want to briefly talk about London Fashion Week. At the moment there are three big main shows, British Fashion Council (on schedule), Fashion Scout (off schedule) and Fashions Finest (off schedule). The first two shows are seen as mainstream and feature mainstream designers and rarely have any black models, Fashion Scout has at least one or two more than British Fashion Council shows, but listen to this our Show Fashions Finest was described as a "black" show (this was said by a white person). Was I surprised by this, yes I was and I was surprised because as far I was concerned I did not see our show in terms of the colour of our designers but simply that we had a good designers. Then again I suppose I am being naïve as the moment you have more than one black designer and two black models at a show then duh it must be a black show. It's irrelevant that we had white designers, Polish and English models at the show and the ratio of black/white models and designers was evenly balanced in the eyes of mainstream our shows are black shows.

Mr Mahogany's Commentary:

I applaud the three super divas (said in the nicest of ways) for their initiation of this campaign and I applaud Iman even more for her stance that she would not spend her money with any designer that refuses to use black models. I just wish that more of us would take that stand and stop putting money into the pockets of those that refuse to use us in their shows or campaigns but are very happy to take our money and grow rich.
I do hope that one day especially our women will wake up to this slap in the face and stop spending money with these designers, the only way to teach them a lesson is to hit them where it hurts them the most - in their wallet.

It is absolutely outstanding that Iman and co have the courage to actually name and shame the designers and as far as I am concerned it's about time too. The beauty of it all is they can't be sued because there is documentary evidence to prove their claim.
Fashions Finest has no regrets for being viewed as we are because we have become and I can say it categorically the biggest and only multicultural show during London Fashion Week.

Even though the black community is not vocal about their outrage at the lack of recognition for people of colour on the fashion catwalks of the world, either by the showing of models or designers at the big shows at least black people particularly Africans have started trying to do something about it. This can been seen by the wave of independent fashion weeks that are springing up around the world particularly the Africa Fashion Week's such as Africa Fashion Week London and Africa Fashion Week New York to name just two of the biggest amongst the 10 or more shows there are around the world. The message is we can do bad all by ourselves.

I don't think things will ever change amongst the designers and the owners of the official big four fashion weeks unless there is a massive public outcry or legislation is introduced and that is never going to happen, simply because unlike Jewish and Asian people black people just accept things, we moan quietly in our homes but don't have the guts and the courage to stand up and fight for what we complain about. I say it all the time and people laugh at me but part of the reason why I don't get any recognition within mainstream despite what I have achieved is because I have and I am prepared to rock the establishment boat, but sadly the likes of myself and Angel Sinclair cannot change the world by ourselves.

It reminds me when I hear black people complain that black people don't win such shows as X Factor, Britains Got Talent etc – very simply put it's because you won't vote either cos you are too damn cheap or just can't be bothered, but you can be bothered to complain (the use of YOU is not aimed at you personally that is reading this blog, it's just a general term I use), however if you do feel you fit the mould then I say no more.

If there is anything I can do to support this campaign you can trust me that I will be screaming from the rooftops and if any of you wish to join me, I have an enormously big roof.

Published in Blog
Monday, 12 August 2013 20:52

What is wrong with Black People?...

I know that I just did a blog yesterday about AFWL but as I was going through the AFWL Facebook fan page I came across a comment left by a gentleman and it related to this picture.




The comments he left underneath the picture were as follows (I have left the comments unedited);

"i thought this was african fashion week so where are the africans... take a leaf out of burberry, calvin klein etc So why dont we see more and its only the token one we see yet on ours we give even a bigger proportion. Im well in tuned with the fashion industry and had friends turned down for syupid reasons. Why call it African week then. Hello well if 95% of your models are African then lets see more of them as those u keep on publishing do tally with your response. I am not being misled by the colour of the skin and fully aware there are whites not only in South Africa but also in the eastern part of Africa. I am not alone who noticed this but friends of mine also but have decided to reserve their comments. In future think about what the African event stands for as if it was European or other parts of the globe this would of been considered and equality would not come into play. Its just an advice not a criticism pls note"

I love it when he says its just advice and not criticism - according to the English Oxford Dictionary Criticism is deifned as "the expression of disapproval of someone or something on the basis of perceived faults or mistakes" ok I know I am Nigerian and my English is not very good, but to me it sounds like his comments fall under the definition of criticism but who the hell is he to give us advice; when he is spending the money AFWL spent on the show, or he becomes a sponsor or is one of the 100's of people that worked on the show or better still he actually attended the show, then I would very much welcome his advice but at the moment I take it as criticism.

My View on the above:

Yes I am so going to rant, infact I have already started, as it riles me up big time that after all the effort that was put into AFWL and the money spent, the only thing this man could pick up upon was the fact that in his view we had too many non-African models or AFWL was purposely only putting up pictures of the nonblack models on the website and Facebook page.

Before I go on let me break it down for all of you with some hard core facts about the models used.

We had 38 models in total
  • 3 white models
  • 2 Brazilian (I guest under his definition they are white as well)
  • 1 male Asian model
  • The rest of the models were either black African/Caribbean or models of dual heritage whom under normal standards are considered as black
So out of 38 models we have a total of 6 models that may not be considered black and that means that our show does not represent the name of the show - AFWL?

I am sooooooooooo confused, so he is saying that we must be like the rest of the world and discriminate against a good model because of the colour of her skin. AFWL is about being inclusive and we welcome models, designers and visitors of any colour or nationality and no matter what people say we would continue to promote all types of models and designers. It just amazes me that people can be so short sighted. I believe that if you have nothing good or positive to say then just SHUT YOUR MOUTH, it's not by force that you must say something especially if it is rubbish.

If he thinks that we did not do a good job then he should go spend £100k and do his own show. He stated that his friends felt the same way, well to that one I say birds of a feather flock together. I think his comments are disrespectful to all of the models not just the non-black models and gives the impression that we don't value our black models.

I have been working in this industry for over 35 years and I have fought hard to the detriment of my business and financial benefit (and I also think that is why I have not yet received my MBE), to make sure that black models, designers and black businesses are given a fair chance to succeed and to have someone say that we are favouring white people over our own, seriously pisses me off (I guess you can tell from my blog).

However I may be wrong and maybe when I was selecting the models I did have far more non black models than models of colour and if that is the case I am man enough to take the criticism, so please feel free to leave your comments on the AFWL page with your honest thoughts (this is the link).

I am particularly keen to hear from the models, designers and those that actually attended the show and once I see the feedback – good or bad I will do a part two to this saga.

For now I need to take a cold shower to calm down and for my readers that really let their thoughts go wild please note that is the only reason I am taking a cold shower.
Published in Blog
Sunday, 11 August 2013 20:37

African Fashion Takes over the World...

Disclaimer: this is a totally biased review done by me (Mr Mahogany) and I can assure you that it is going to be 100% biased and will be a great review, so if you feel that you cannot read a totally biased review stop reading now.

I know a lot of you don't like to read nowadays, so I will attempt to keep it short and do it in chapters for you, so that you can take your time and read chapter at a time.

Introduction

I was recently informed by someone that the publicity for Africa Fashion Week London (AFWL) was not very good as lots of people had not heard about it, so just in case you are one of them I thought it best to let you know what AFWL is. However if you are of African descent, love fashion and live in the UK and have not heard of AFWL – you need to get out more and get some friends.

I have no intention of writing something from my head about what AFWL is about, so being honest I just went to the website and copied what AFWL is about – "Africa Fashion Week London (AFWL) is the biggest African event of its kind in Africa. A collaborative fashion exhibition, highlighting the industry's established and emerging African designers, AFWL is at the forefront of capturing the surge of the African inspired trends in the fashion industry. Our annual event aims to celebrate the work of African and African inspired designers in the UK and worldwide". In short, it is a fashion week and exhibition that showcases African or African inspired designers/exhibitors – the last bit was written by me – not a bad summation, even if I say so myself.



Now let's get to the juicy bits.

Chapter One - Fittings

I arrived in the UK about a week before the show, "hold on wait a minute" (not sure if you know that phrase in a famous song – you need to say it like that if you know the song – I am not telling you what it is, go figure it out), I am sure you do not think that I just started work on the show a week before the event, trust me I have been working on the event for the past 9 months.

Normally I would be in town much earlier but there is just so much going on in Nigeria that I could not leave any earlier, so I get straight into town and start the fittings. We had two very intensive days of fittings. Let me break it down for you 40 plus models, 20 plus styling team, and over 65 designers to fit in two days that is a lot of work. Now I am not really talking about the actual fittings I am talking about it is a lot of work to deal with sooooooo many women. Thank you Lord for patience, by his grace I got through it - JUST!



Before I go on, to all the men that are reading this and are envious of me that I am around all these women and you have the wrong kind of thoughts going through your one track mind – behave - but more importantly you need to bear two things in mind –

One, for me it's like being a doctor – no big deal (stop calling me a liar) and two, most of you men as bad as you think you are, you know you can't handle two women at the same time, so imagine me having to deal with over 100 different women and every single one of them thinks she is something special (before I get into any trouble, ladies you were all very special – hopefully by saying this I have escaped with my life).

We had a few drama's but we got it done. Before I go onto chapter two I must talk about my fantastic Nigerian designers, i am referring to those that came from Nigeria not Nigerian designers that live in the UK. We are in season 3 of AFWL, so I now know the score, so when I was scheduling the fittings I moved most of the Nigerian designers that were coming from Nigeria all to the same day and I warned the team of what to expect and they did not disappoint me.



Despite them being sent the model board and them picking their models in advance, they arrived on the day and completely changed all of their models, I should ask for money back for my ink and all the wasted paper from printing off their model lists. it does not stop there, I had some designer that were given a fitting slot for Tuesday afternoon and they arrived on Wednesday evening – I am not joking I had a few like that. I had one designer who called me at 10am and said she would be there in the hour and she arrived at 7.30pm – for those of you that know me well – you already know what happened, before I even say it. I said sorry I can't do your fitting you need to come back the following morning at 8am and if you are late I won't fit you and you won't do the show.

Thats right, yes she was on time the next morning. Some of the designers were extremely rude, but I do understand why they were so and that cos they were trained by Alexander McQueen and are making millions of pounds every month. I say no more. As expected the second day of fittings was extremely more stressful. as i say this i must also be fair and say not all the designers took 2 hours to fit when they were only alloted 30 minutes and a number of them were on time, extremely professional and very well prepared.

It would not be fair to only say the designers were divas, as some of the models were no better and I had to ask a few to leave and the number one reason is this - you are booked to do a job and you take it voluntarily, no one held a gun to your head and then you arrive at the fitting and tell me that you want to leave by 3pm (we were to finish by 6pm), so that you can go to another casting – it's a bit like you being at work and telling your boss that instead of leaving work at 6pm you want to leave at 3pm so that you can start your other job early but you still expect your boss to pay you for the 3 hours that you are working somewhere else – I don't think so. The good thing is after sending a couple of models home we were left with the best and the two days of fittings went smoothly.

Chapter Two – Backstage

On the Thursday the day started very early for everyone as we had to be at the Old Truman Brewery (the venue) by 8.30am. The day started with some fittings for the designers that missed their fitting slot earlier in the week, then onto hair and makeup. As for me I was putting the final touches to the set design, sound and lighting working with the technical team and making sure everything was on point. I also did a walk through with the models and ensured they knew their routines and would walk like top models, we also did some filming for Arise TV which went out live. Hair was done by Mizani (L'Oreal – I know some of you would know that name better) and makeup was by Fashion Fair which was led by my main man Mr Gorgeous. So I had a great team behind me.

Throughout the entire 3 days of shows we had numerous film crews doing interviews and it seemed like 100's of photographers were always backstage taking pictures. Backstage this year was great as we had plenty of space so it was far easier to work and Malaika Mwaniki our head stylist was super well organised and ran it like a military camp.



Chapter Three – The Show

Our first show was at 4pm on the Thursday and the last show was at 8.30pm on the Saturday, throughout the 3 days we had 10 different shows and showcased over 60 plus designers. The range of designers was vast and the catwalk was an array of colours and styles ranged from street, to swimwear, to couture and was a mixture of student, new, aspiring and established designers. the youngest designer being 14 year old Tumisola Ladega, designers came from across the world including Switzerland, Zambia, Ghana, USA, Nigeria, the UK and South Africa. South Africa sent over a fantastic delegation of 9 of their best designers and in addition AFWL was privileged to have the phenomenal Thula Sindi showcase and it was nice working with one of Nigeria's hottest designers Zizi Cardow. I try not to mention designers individually but I loved working with Didi Creations, Moofa and Steve Mandy Designs who actually created a hand painted dress live on the catwalk whilst his collection was being showcased.



However in terms of producing a show, for me the one that I had most fun with and the designer that took it to another level in terms of the production of her designs, the thought behind her original music and me putting the finishing touches to her show was Elegante by tiannahstyling. It was one of the best shows I produced throughout AFWL and based on feedback, those that saw the show were blown away.

AFWL received press from across the world and was featured on the BBC, CNN, Bloomberg, Arise TV, the Flyer Newspaper, Naija Swagger and so many more media outlets, way too many to mention.



I must briefly talk about the music which was produced by AFWL music director Dj Homeboy of Homdiggy Muzik one of the top music production companies in the country, he had people on their feet throughout the whole show and people did not want the after party to end.



Chapter Four – What Else?

There was just so much going on, in terms of the exhibition – I managed to go round the exhibition area on the Saturday and I was amazed at the array of clothes, bags, shoes, food and services that were on display. The exhibition area was lively and vibrant, with music being played by DJ Abass. The women (and men) were dressed to kill and made sure that they would be noticed and they were. I saw men suffering from double vision as they did not know where to look when it came to the women that were at AFWL and those attending with their wives were being slapped around the head for comitting lookery.

This was generally a stress free show (not that any show can really be stress free) but I did not shout much and I think we had it locked down in terms of producing the show.

Chapter Five - The Dorchester

I bet some of you thought that it ended at the Old Turman Brewery on the Saturday, it did not as on the Sunday we had the African Arts & Fashion Exhibition which was a prestigious gala event hosted by AFWL life patron Princess Fifi Ejindu. The stars were out in force with the likes of Alexandra Burke, Bianca Jagger, June Sarpong, Nadia Buari, super model Noella Musunka, Singer Shingai Shoniwa, Misha B and was hosted by Sky TV presenter Lukwesa Burak and a great performance by the CEO Dancers, everyone seems to love them.



The event could not be complete without a fashion show which featured 8 of Africa's hottest designers – Zizi Cardow, Thula Sindi, Adebayo Jones, Sally Itiego, Moofa, Ella & Gabby, Gisella Boutique and Kitiko.

It was a very glamorous affair with a sumptuous three course dinner, I can only say that it looked sumptuous as I didn't get to eat any of it, but it looked good and it definitely made me hungry. I cant believe I did an event at the Dorchester and did not get to eat – Ronke I am upset oh.

Overall AFWL was amongst the best events I have produced in recent times and I must commend Ronke Ademiluyi the founder of AFWL and her team for a fantastic job that they did. More importantly she must be given credit for assisting designers that would not normally be given the chance to showcase at an international standard fashion week and she was able to bring the eyes of the world to the event.

Check out the album below as well as the different pictures and comments on my FACEBOOK PAGE – feel free to leave your comments.

Chapter Six

It's enough now, go and do something else I am tired.
Published in Blog
Founded in 2010, by Amanda Rabor, Isossy Children is a celebration of colour, vivacity, global influences and fashion.
Published in Trends
Wednesday, 17 August 2011 00:55

Africa Fashion Week London 2011

Highlights from Africa Fashion Week London, fashion and creative designs from Africa.
Published in Fashion
Wednesday, 17 August 2011 00:41

Prima Rouge @ AFWL

Africa Fashion Week London showcasing Prima Rouge.
Published in Fashion
Thursday, 11 August 2011 22:12

Nupé Mag @ African Fashion Week London 2011

Highlights from Africa Fashion Week London
Published in Fashion
I can gladly say that I made it home safely after Africa Fashion Week London (AFWL), I had to call in the Royal Protection Squad to escort me home. As you ask me why, I will explain later...

Mr Mahogany's Review Saying it as it is...


After a year of planning for AFWL, yesterday 6th August saw the culmination of two days of non stop fashion shows featuring the best from designers that felt that Africa was important to them. I say it like this because not all the designers that show cased at AFWL were from Africa or of African heritage. We had designers from Poland, Scotland, India, Dominica as well as designers that flew in from all over Africa. The show was open to any designer that felt that being involved in AFWL was important to them.

AFWL was produced by Mahogany Productions and Events and a lot of people may not realise it but history was made - for the first time ever 50 designers were shown in just two days, over 40 models were used, 2400 people got to watch the 8 shows and unfortunately over 2700 people did not get to see the shows due to each show being full to capacity each time and we had over 8500 people register for tickets for the show.

Photographers and film crews came from countries such as Nigeria, Ghana, Holland, France, Germany and other places from around the globe.

The list of A1 press that were in attendance was unbelievable and included the BBC, Reuters, Comic Relief (sent 20 bloggers down), Vogue, Sky, FAB Magazine, Ben TV and the Fashions Finest team was there in full force, way too many press to mention them all.

As I read the Tweets and Facebook messages I am starting to catch up with the celebrities that dropped by which included the CEO of Africa Fashion Week (South Africa), Senator Giwa, Alexander Amusu, Adebayo Jones, representatives from various African and European embassies and so many more. As far as I am concerned everyone that attended was a celebrity.

Now let's get down to the Kitty gritty the show itself. My honest opinion is that for the first show of its kind it was an outstanding and a fantastic success.

Overall all of the shows started dead on time which does not even happen consistently at the top fashion weeks around the world. Out of 8 shows only the finale gala night started half an hour late and this was due to capacity issues and too many people that did not have invitations trying to get in and a problem with AFWL being honest, not managing the press and the VIP invitations as well as they could have and finally with our people being rude to the venue staff who nearly put a stop to the gala because of these people.

When we finally resolved all issues, we informed that no more people couldcome in even though we were not at full capacity. So to a number of my personal friends that got turned away - yes by me, I am sorry but it really was not my fault. Even with all of that we still should only have been 15 minutes late but then the unbelievable happened a senseless lady decided that the best place for her to put her glass of red wine was on the stage which was covered in a pure white carpet - before I say it you already know what I am going to say - yes you are right she spilt it on the stage and turned my lovely white carpet into what looked like the aftermath of a murder scene, you know when a body has been removed but the blood is still there. It was a good thing that my staff refused to point her out to me, as this blog would have been coming to you from Brixton prison.

So the dilemma for me was could I go on with the show with this massive red stain in the middle of the stage, what could I do? I had no option but to call my production guys in and with 250 people in the hall we assessed the situation and made the decision that we would change the carpet and within 15 minutes the great Ricardo, the crew and I got down on our hands and knees and replaced the carpet. The Red Carpet Stain

We eventually started the gala show at 7.30, 30 minutes later than planned. Those of you who know me would know that I would have been very upset at being late but all the guests that were lucky enough to get in were patient and very understanding and throughout I made sure that I kept everyone informed of what was happening, as I dislike it when I attend a show and its running late and I am just sitting there and I have no idea as to why or what is happening.

As far as I am concerned everything about the shows worked, the designers were as a whole were on point, just a few of them need to work on their finishing and quality of the fabric they used but that is the beauty of being part of AFWL, everyone is given a chance and it is primarily aimed at graduate, new and aspiring designers. It is unfair to name any particular designers as standing out but based on some of the independent reviews some of the designers to watch were Sve, Mia by Mia Nisbet, Adookeh, Ozora and menswear was stolen by Zekarayas Solomon, and our very own Top Model of Colour winner featured with her Adopted Culture label, however as far as I am concerned all of the designers that featured at AFWL were outstanding.

Now, there were two distinct areas that I think AFWL fell short on and that was managing the overwhelming amount of press and in particular the issuance of press passes, by this I mean it's ok to invite the press but any particular media house should have been restricted to a specific number of passes (no more than two per media house) but the few times I had to help out at the door I found members of the press were bringing in friends who did not work for that media house. The second issue was that we had way to many people show up then we could get into the venue, I know a lot of people said that we should have restricted the ticket registration system but not sure that would have been fair. For example we had over 8000 people register for tickets but only 3500 came to the venue and based on that if we had restricted it a lot of people that did actually get in to the shows may not have.

So my summation and how I feel about some of the issues raised by a variety of people. This was our first ever fashion week and comparing us to London Fashion Week that has been running for 26 years and has a budget that runs into millions somehow does not make sense. I go to LFW as press every February and September and for some of the shows I queue up forever and don't always get in and sadly that is life and this happens more so when it is free. Why should we at AFWL be held to a higher standard and compared to others that have far better resources than us, I am not saying give me and the AFWL team a knighthood etc but before saying things like because I did not get in I will not do business with African designers that does not make sense - well not to me anyway.


AFWL welcomes all of the comments and feedback that we have received good and bad and we will act upon it and try and improve where we can but if any of you think that at AFWL demand would not exceed supply, then sorry people you are not being realistic, unless of course we charge you £30 to get into each show.

I must say that I had a fantastic team that worked with me on the show and it is a must that I mention and thank them publicly for the fantastic job that they did:

Twisted Fashion - our event managers (superstars beyond superstars)
Sonia - our head of styling team
Mink Cosmetics - make up sponsors
Real Hair by Clara - hair sponsors
Linda Buckingham - who should have been relaxing watching her young daughter model but instead worked tirelessly backstage All of the fantastic models
Krystle - press
Ricardo - man above all men
The great team of volunteers that helped throughout the show

I must commend the founders of AFWL Ronke & Kamari Ademuliyi who had the vision and the courage to do such a big event and bring it to the UK and finally to all of you whether you attended or not for supporting us and recognising that if we are one, we will go places and achieve great things.

I bet you thought I forgot as to why I said I had to get the Royal Protection Squad, you know I would never do that to you. To try and ensure that the gala event went as smoothly as possible I had to take over the supervision of people gaining access to the gala and this was due to the fact that information had come to my attention that lots of people were eager to attend even though they did not have tickets to this invitation only event. In the process of being creative director I also became head of security and head bouncer and I had the unfortunate duty of turning away or refusing to grant entry to NUMEROUS people, which sadly included some friends and business associates that I have known for many, many years. In the process of doing this I was told about myself in no uncertain terms and I saw a few people the following day who said I looked directly at them and refused to let them in. Firstly I did not see them and secondly - I am really sorry but this is business for me and I believe it is important to be as fair as possible. It must be noted that I knew 100's of people that came to AFWL and would have been unfair if I just let in people that I knew or I had worked with.

To my friends, I know a few of you took it personally as I felt the cold shoulder when I spoke to you the following day, well how I feel about that is that you can't really be my friend as you would have understood and not have taken it to heart. As mentioned above there were issues I had to deal with and dealt with everything as fairly as I could. I am not being arrogantor pompous but as the saying goes "frankly my dear I don't give a dam".
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