Thursday, 07 October 2021 13:28

A/W21 denim trends, era of freedom

There is one staple piece in everyone's wardrobe that literally made history. There is one true fashion must-have that crossed generations, yet never felt outdated. You can have a guess. It is denim.

A/W2021 denim trends Very.co.ukVery.co.uk

Although timeless, denim jeans marked a drastic change in everyday fashion this year. Jeans are our flag of freedom. We have seen it throughout 2021 and these autumn/winter trends are not an exception.


The humble workers' denim passed through centuries and generations and, as such, it is a trustful mirror of our times. Maybe it is the new post-pandemic lifestyle or today's feminist stream but 2021 waved 'goodbye' to super skinny jeans to welcome (back) baggy forms to put everyone at ease. Here we go, exploring the 5 top denim trends for this autumn/winter season.

1 Mom's Jeans

Mom's jeans, A/W 2021 denim trends - MissguidedMissguided - Riot Highwaisted Clean Mom Jeans

Ten years ago, moms had a certain 'uncool' factor. Could you believe mom's jeans were going to conquer a big slice in stores' displays and people's shopping charts? High-waisted and relaxed, mom jeans are not anymore for leisure time and gardening but a comfortable ally now that home is our office.

2 Upcycled Jeans

V by Very sustainable jeans, A/W 2021 denim trendsV by Very - Sustainable Slim Cut Jeans

The call to make something for the planet translates into sustainable jeans. Whether they are made from vintage stocks, eco-consciously produced, recycled or thrifted by you; green jeans have a richer story and feel lighter on the environment.

3 '70s: Flared Legs And Flavours

'70s and flared jeans, A/W 2021 denim trendsRI Petite - Amelie Flare Dane Jean

Jeans as a flag of freedom could not but take big inspiration from the '70s. The 'peace & love' decade revival is in flared silhouettes, patterns and patchwork. Added to the upcycling trends, looking for a true vintage makes a trip to second-hand stores definitely more adventurous and rewarding.

4 Baggy Jeans

Baggy jeans, A/W 2021 denim trendsNew Look - Noosa Baggy Jean

'The wider, the better', this is the motto of the year. Mom jeans already offer some room for our real shapes, but this season we can exceed as we look back at the '90s. Think about rappers and skaters' styles when looking for our next pair of denim. The must-have jeans for the last bits of this 2021 are super baggy and slouchy. Young and unapologetic with added distress for an extra touch of street style.

5 Light Jeans

Light wash, A/W 2021 denim trendsLevi's - 501® Crop

Nothing says 'denim' more than an original Levi's 501. The American brand invented the real jeans at the end of the 19th century but it proves to be always fashion-forward. Here is how Levi's reinvented its 501 this year.

Denim signature colour is blue but we can set free from the tradition with pale blues, neutrals and even white.

These are only 5 of the top denim trends that we can rock this autumn/winter season but the list may go on and on with pleated jeans, straight cuts and low-rise waist. This year's array of denim as seen on Very.co.uk says it clearly: denim must make you comfortable in your own skin. 2021 jeans are a liberation, liberation from strict and unrealistic ideals proposed by the media for many decades. It was time to change, the evergreen denim made it.

Published in Blog
Wednesday, 29 September 2021 12:56

Gen Z, the ethical fashion generation

Gen Z is fashion-forward and makes a big slice of the global fashion customer base with its generous $200 billion (more than £147 billion) annual global spend power. A new study by UNiDAYS shed light on the decisional power of the 'zoomers' and their commitment to clean and ethical fashion.

Gen Z, UNiDAYS fashion report

A new report commissioned by UNiDAYS, the world’s largest student affinity network, looked into the approach of Gen Z toward fashion, trends, e-commerce, and more. The result: Gen Z demands ethical fashion out loud.


Nearly seven in ten (68%) of Gen Z members demand that their clothes are manufactured to the highest ethical standards and 57% feel brands championing sustainability, equality and diversity are getting it right. These figures come from the recent report run by UNiDAYS surveying a panel of more than 18k Gen Z students to explore Gen Z’ fashion trends and preferences, their attitudes to retailers, sustainability, pricing and more.

Gen Z and fashion habits. Ph. Rodnae Productions, PexelsPh. Rodnae Production, Pexels

UNiDAYS Gen Z Fashion Report – Clean Fashion And Gendered Clothing

UNiDAYS asked a panel of their 20m+ verified student members for their opinions on all things fashion, in a series of surveys and polls. Over 18k Gen Z students provided insights about their relationships with their devices, platforms, fashion favourites and retail habits. The polls revealed passionate feelings towards clean-washing, conversation commerce, brand intrusion, third gender marketing and lack of trust when shopping through new social media checkout features.

As the role of real-world fashion adapts, fluid and device-driven business models must emerge for the fashion industry to serve the world’s first, and largest, generation of digital natives.

With global digital ad spend on social platforms predicted to hit $517 billion by 2023 (more than £380 billion), insight into the world’s biggest consumer demographic will support the bricks-and-mortar survivors and define the establishment of new fashion brands rising through the metaverse, all with Gen Z at their core.

Meet Gen Z

Born between 1996–2012, Gen Z is the most hyper-informed, hyper-connected and demanding generation of consumers in history. At 40% of total consumers, 'zoomers' are the biggest generation globally with a $3 trillion indirect annual spending power.

Unique Behaviours

Zoomers expect customised, personalised products and services plus value, across every device and every platform all with free delivery. Their real-world and digital existence are basically one and the same, with nuanced values that can seem contradictory on the surface: they love filters but resent retouching, they live and breathe social media, instant messaging, video games and live-streaming often all at the same time.

Gen Z' attention span is 8 seconds. Compared to 12 seconds for Millenials.

Make Connections

Their unwavering style, ethics and thrift make Gen Z the ultimate Apex Consumer. Brands must urgently connect with this high-potential, savvy, digital-native generation that is reshaping social commerce. Both start-ups and legacy brands could find this new world order daunting, but it represents great possibility.

  • 2 BN direct annual global spending power
  • 92% use discount codes 
  • 40% of total consumers in the UK, US, Europe & BRIC

Fashion-phoria

Gen Z, the apex fashion consumer. UNiDAYS research

  • 90% say looking good is important to them
  • 96% say fabulous clothes make them feel confident
  • 93% love how great clothes make them feel
  • 80% enjoy a mix of styles
  • 87% say great clothes make them feel sexy
  • 56% say they do not follow fashion trends

GEN Z members are full-on fashionistas, their style, habits and ethics drive and dominate the trends and patterns are seen through social media and the surrounding generations today. 87% of zoomers agree that great clothes make them feel sexy, 96% say fabulous clothes make them feel confident and 79% state sustainable fashion is important to them. But they never pay full price. For anything.

If Gen Z Is Not Your Core Consumer Now, They Soon Will Be...

Gen Z maintains its own personal brands physically and across their platforms, with defined standards and values that dictate the brands they associate with. The average Gen Z spends 10.6 hours a day online (Adobe), 93% love great clothes, and 85% of them research everything online before buying. Zoomers' appetite for social is huge and brands have been quick to embrace the fun and engagement that quality content generates. But with 75% of Gen Z stating they do not trust shopping on social media, there is a disconnect between entertainment and commerce which brands must fast address. Gen Z is consuming culture and marketing in a fundamentally different way than Millennials or Gen X (the over the forties).

Of those surveyed, 87% of Gen Z mostly communicate with their friends through instant messaging, just 13% call them direct, and only 14% would try a new fashion retailer based on seeing a TV ad. Fashion brands must get creative to establish and nurture these new relationships to ensure they stand the test of time.

Viviane Paxinos, global GM at UNiDAYS, states: 'We found that, for Gen Z, TikTok is the place to be on social, followed by Instagram. Given that fashion purchases made by 49% of those we spoke to were influenced by brands they saw on social media, platforms like TikTok and Instagram are a growth opportunity for fashion retail marketers looking to drive brand awareness and social commerce. Another important factor stems from TikTok's early guidance to marketers: don’t make ads. Make TikTok's.'

Good News For Fashions

  • 76% are looking forward to partying again
  • 64% expect to spend more on outfits for events now
  • 78% plan to dress up party now that lockdown has eased
  • 54% will spend more on beauty now social occasions are back

Despite 18 months in lockdown, 90% of Gen Z still value looking good. However, 65% expect their fashion purchases not only to be affordable but to be made to the highest ethical standards. Fashion, fast or otherwise, can no longer rely on value alone.

'Audiences go to the likes of TikTok, Instagram, Snapchat and YouTube for exclusive moments, entertainment, advice, humour, and authenticity in content. Fashion brands need to create content that feels genuine for the environment, or Gen Z consumers will swipe to the next video. Fashion brands should also be looking at social commerce as part of their wider omnichannel retail strategy, driving consumers in-store for brands where bricks and mortar play an important role. 84% of Gen Z are looking forward to returning to shops, and it shouldn’t be underestimated how impactful a shareable, interactive store experience would be in driving positive online endorsement and sales.'
Viviane Paxinos, global GM at UNiDAYS

Extreme Value

Gen Z' fashion values

  • 95% always keep an eye out for a bargain or offer
  • 75% are used to buying clothes solely online due to lockdowns
  • 53% say shopping is a social experience shared with friends
  • 85% research online before committing to a purchase
  • 82% are loyal to brands that offer regular discounts
  • 66% intend to spend more on clothes when they go back to Uni
  • 63% spent less on clothes during lockdown while 37% spent more
  • 84% are looking forward to returning to shops

Trust And Confidence

  • 49% do not mind advertising if it’s relevant to them
  • 76% see too many ads on their feeds
  • 83% want to cut their time spent on social media
  • 75% do not trust shopping directly on social media
  • 53% believe social media is bad for society
  • 93% say social media promotes unrealistic life and body goals/ beauty standards
  • 90% believe that unlabelled, retouched imagery should be illegal for influencers to use when endorsing brands/products

For the majority of Gen Z, online is its preferred way to shop; 85% research online first but 75% do not trust shopping directly on social media. Brands creating Instagram and TikTok content and those collaborating with influencers should be cautious, 90% of Gen Z believe it should be illegal for Influencers to use unlabelled and retouched images, while 93% believe social media promotes unrealistic life and body goals. Despite being the world’s first fully digital native consumer whose digital presence is as real as their physical one, they challenge everything they see.

Clean Fashion

Gen Z is conflicted: 59% of zoomers consider themselves woke, but one in four do not know where their clothes are manufactured.

Fast fashion serves zoomers' obsession for new and fresh, but grates against their ethical guilty conscience of quality not quantity. The rise of Depop and co. signifies a new dawn for wardrobe resale hacks that do not cost the earth, but where does that leave fast fashion brands? How deep does their culture of sustainability go?

Gen Z’s Earth-friendly attitudes and spending behaviours have triggered fashion to clean up their emissions and exploitation records, so a happy medium is emerging. Sustainability is finally being addressed by brands keen to be on the right side of history and stay relevant. Gen Z has zero tolerance for irresponsible brands, they are the sole demographic with the passion, power and platforms to take sustainability into the corporate boardrooms. Their digital and physical life are one of the same, which ensures their social media posts will continue to elevate those brands that champion change and shame those that blatantly do not.

Sad But True

It takes 3,781 litres of water and 33.4 Kg of carbon emissions to make one pair of jeans. Up to 175,000 tonnes of plastic microfibres are dumped into the ocean each year, equivalent to over 17bn plastic bottles, all from synthetic clothing. Microfibres cannot be easily extracted from water and pollute the marine wildlife food chain.
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

Gen Z on Clean Clothing

  • 26% unsure where their clothes are manufactured
  • 79% say sustainable fashion is important to them
  • 68% want clothes manufactured to the highest ethical standards
  • 59% consider themselves ‘woke’
  • 23% feel peer pressure to shop more sustainably
  • 39% would buy pre-loved because it is more sustainable
  • 33% pick recycled items because they are cheaper
  • 67% prefer fashion brands that appeal to their social conscience
  • 33% feel that brands who champion sustainability do so in the right way

Gen Z On Clean Beauty

  • 86% say clean beauty is important to them
  • 33% always read the ingredients label before a purchase
  • 88% prefer natural beauty and skincare products
  • 78% have returned a product to the shelf because of the ingredient

Responsibility

Who does Gen Z think should be responsible for regulating the beauty industry to ensure they use sustainable and harmless ingredients in their products?

  • 20% the government
  • 47% the brands themselves
  • 29% an independent industry regulator

Increased Desire For Gender Neutrality

Gen Z and gender fluidity in fashion. UNiDAYS study.

'More than ever, mainstream consumers are being challenged to rethink accepted societal norms and structures driven solely by gen z’s passion for post-gender diversity and inclusion.'
Viviane Paxinos, global GM at UNiDAYS

Gen Z embraces gender-neutral products and marketing. Zoomers acceptance has generated a wave of opportunity for fashion and beauty brands to expand into non-binary clothing and product lines. Six years ago, at its height of popularity, Facebook added a third, customisable gender choice that offers 58 identity options such as androgyne, transmale, trans-person and more other brands soon followed.

The beauty industry saw campaigns for cosmetics start to include trans models and cis straight men. Global fashion brands including Farfetch, Missguided, ASOS and Boohoo have all recently launched high profile campaigns featuring diverse and empowering models to promote their inclusive collections.

Blurred Lines

Generation gender-neutral has the least concern over owning ‘gender appropriate’ clothing, preferring to shop by personal style of self-expression, rather than traditional labels.

  • 43% believe that assigned gender does not play a role in choosing clothes
  • 23% think gendered language in stores is outdated or offensive
  • 79% are not put off buying clothes that are marketed to the opposite gender
  • 64% have bought clothing for themselves that is marketed to the opposite gender

Luxury Brands Must Adapt...

'Be aware, brand equity that triggers gen x will not trigger Gen Z. 79% of young consumers agree that sustainable fashion is important to them and 68% want clothes manufactured to the highest ethical standards. Luxury brands must adapt their narrative to apply to the new apex consumer that is gen z. Generic claims of craftsmanship will not cut it with this demanding ethics driven group, they want specifics.' Josh Rathour, found and CEO of UNIDAYS

Label Lovers

Luxury brands obviously find engaging with young consumers difficult as 71% of Gen Z feel designer brands are not relevant to them. But by over-focusing on Gen X (the over the forties) and not connecting with a younger audience, aspirational brands risk not only alienating their appeal to Millennials but their future core consumer too. Brands that underestimate Gen Z risk their relevance and label longevity. Gen Z is the most demanding, informed and least loyal consumers in history, if they find a brand irrelevant now, the likelihood is they will never buy into the brand at all. Affinity is seeded in youth. Luxury brands that do not emotionally engage with their future consumer will ultimately fail.

Designer Desire

  • 32% follow designers
  • 47% buy luxury clothing as a treat
  • 40% have an eye for limited-editions
  • 27% buy luxury clothing for the quality
  • 54% describe themselves as loyal to certain fashion brands

Loving Luxe

  • 30% have bought 1-2 pieces of designer clothing this year
  • 50% say they have bought more fashion in 2021 than previous years
  • 47% name design as their top consideration when buying luxury fashion
  • 64% name price as their top consideration when buying luxury fashion

HOWEVER...

  • 54% do not love labels
  • 27% believe designer clothes are of higher quality
  • 77% say they cannot afford designer brands
  • 54% have not bought any luxury fashion this year
  • 71% do not feel designer brands are relevant to them

Do Not Survive, Thrive

Gen Z' fashion habits

If Gen Z is not your core consumer now, they soon will be.
Gen Z is defining which fashion brands survive and which brands thrive. Those labels comfortable with Gen X and Millennials must learn what triggers Gen Z and fast. Affinity is seeded in the young, fashion brands that do not bother engaging Gen Z will ultimately fail. But despite being the world’s first fully digital native consumer with defined personal brands, and whose digital presence is as real as their physical one, Gen Z’s relationship with the platforms they populate is guarded at best.

Brands must work hard to win trust in the social space. Gen Z' unwavering standards, ethics and thrift make Gen Z the ultimate Apex Consumer. Brands must urgently connect with this unfamiliar, contrary, digital-native generation who are reshaping social commerce. Fashion start-ups and legacy brands could find this new world order daunting, but it represents great possibility.

Published in Blog

The '70s are back! An era full of glam, disco, Bowie, Jagger, bell bottoms, bold prints, crochet, dagger collar blouses and so much more. '70s style pieces are full-fledged on again. So, stock up your autumn wardrobe with these five essentials that should not be missed in anyone’s closet this autumn season.

'70s vinatge fashion. Essentials for A/W wardrobe. Ph. Julian Myles, UnsplashPh. Julian Myles, Unsplash

'70s kaleidoscopic style is the hottest fashion trend on Instagram, a good source of inspiration to make vintage looks truly yours. Perfect vibes for the upcoming autumn season, these are our 5 essentials for your wardrobe.


Retro aesthetics of the ‘70s are taking over our social media pages, and surely we all know what this era’s fashion stands for, right? You may have a lot of associations but read on to find out how you can also adapt those to contemporary trends.

Penny Lane Coats

Penny Lane coats. '70s vintsge fashion essentials. Credits @hannahlouisefA black & white example embellished with silver star and moon stitching, seen on influencer @hannahlouisef.

Showcased on everyone’s Instagram feed at the moment, contemporary brands like House of Sunny and Saks Pott brought about the resurgence of an absolute classic, the Penny Lane coat. Not only do they look fabulous, but also keep you warm and cosy throughout those stormy autumn days about to be faced. Simultaneously, these statement piece coats are spreading huge ‘Almost Famous’ vibes, whose character of Penny Lane is where its name originally stems from.

Formerly better known as Afghan coats, the style was brought into mainstream fashion mainly by celebrities, especially musicians like The Beatles and Jimi Hendrix throughout the late '60s and early '70s, which created all the associations it has with Rock n’ Roll nowadays. Available in plain suede or embellished with stitching and embroidery, they add an effortlessly chic twist to even the most basic outfit, a real no-brainer. Penny Lane coats are here to stay!

Funky Prints

Funky prints. '70s vintage fashion essentials. Credits @mounakaeLondon-based influencer @mounakae effortlessly sports a '70s-inspired swirl patterned set. The halter neck top adds to an overall retro atmosphere.

Battle the upcoming gloomy autumn days with ever more vibrant colours and funky prints. They appear in numerous forms and can be incorporated through basically every form of clothing. No matter if it is a top, blouse, trousers, skirt, jacket, or if you do not want to go all the way simply add a colourful headband or scarf. Chevron and flame stitch, argyle, paisley, swirls, zebra, floral and abstract geometric patterns are just a few infamous '70s patterns to be named. All were influenced by folk and psychedelic rock of the era. Matching sets are an easy way to pull off a nice fit without much effort. Bright colours and bold patterns can complement each other or clash in an offbeat way. This season there is no such thing as too radiant or vibrant. Multi-coloured clothes all the way, it is about mixing and matching, so be bold.

Flared Trousers

Flared trousers. '70s vintage fashion. Credits @hannahlouisef@hannahlouisef wears a classic denim flare with a middle line seam.

First popularised by Cher and Sonny in the mid-'60s, flared trousers became a staple piece of the era, and are interconnected with the counterculture hippie movement.

They are extremely versatile and can be styled in either '70s Americana style, feminine chic, androgynous with a pantsuit, or in a glam rock/disco manner for those nights out and about. Extra points if they are corduroy or in flower print, for the ultimate retro style. A more classic approach would be a pair of simple blue denim in true Farrah Fawcett manner, worn with a colourful top and white trainers. The choice of fabric is key here, they are available in either denim, cotton, corduroy, or polyester and vary in terms of how wide they flare at the bottom and whether they have an additional split hem. One thing is for certain, every kind of flared trousers will give legs for days since the shape is known to elongate the silhouette.

Platform Boots

Platform boots. '70s vintage fashion essentials. Credits letsgetflashy, Ph. Alexandre Alaux@letsgetflashy goes all in with a Bowie-esque approach on colour coordinating platform boots, perfectly fitting her ginger mullet. (Ph. Alexandre Alaux)

The '70s surely were an innovative decade for fashion, as the clothing represented youths newly found carefree mentality and desire to deviate from their parents' generation’s norms regarding outward appearances and attire. The way they dressed was an act of rebellion in itself. Platform boots were mainly popularised by glam rock performers like Elton John, the New York Dolls, and especially David Bowie during his alter ego Ziggy Stardust phase. This made the trend gender-neutral, since Bowie incorporated various queering elements in his stage performances and photoshoots, so a lot of men adopted this element and could be spotted wearing heels.

Due to being considered the era’s disco shoe, the connection to present events seems fitting. Now that clubs have reopened after long months of social distancing, expressing a newfound sense of liberty is once again expressed through head-turning clothes. Online shops frequently advertise new 'going out wear' with phrases and puns referencing a need for customers to prepare for their comeback to the club floors with fitting party outfits, predominantly targeting teens and 20-somethings. Just like the trend was originally about catching attention, the intention remains the same. On a side note, the shoes are particularly petite friendly and can add a good few inches of height, while also keeping your feet dry when stomping through those leaf-covered parks and forests once foliage hits the ground.

Bulky Square-shaped Tinted Sunglasses

Bulky square-shaped sunglasses. '70s vintage essentials. Credits @annacascarina@annacascarina stuns in a simple, yet eye-catching black-framed model with yellow/orange-tinted glasses, which harmonizes very well with her floral printed Resume blouse.

A drastic opposition to the previous tiny sunglasses trend, originally stemming from the '90s. Now the motto certainly is 'the bigger the better!'.

Don’t shy away from colourful tinted glasses to give your fit this extra pop of colour. Particularly popular now are blue, yellow, amber, and red-tinted glasses with a tortoiseshell look frame. A perfect companion when having to hide nasty dark under-eye circles or puffy eyes in the morning.

Where To Get The Look?

It is apparent that these trends are interconnected in cultural significance, socio-political influence, and historical context. A feeling of exuberance seems to be around, which is expressed and underlined through fashion.

Though all items are in some form currently available at the established high street fashion houses, we recommend you take a look at your local thrift store or browse online through secondhand apps like Vinted, Depop, and Etsy to find a truly unique and long-lasting piece of clothing with an attached history. Not only is the quality of fabric and construction usually higher, but buying used clothes contributes to more conscious and sustainable consumption, therefore helping to protect our planet and spreading awareness. If these options do not fit size-wise, upcycling in DIY, or bringing it to a local tailor can easily fix any issue and simultaneously make it more distinctive and individual. Fashion cycles have always existed and will continue to do so, however, now with constant online access to fast-fashion retailers they are speeding up more and more. Nevertheless, the aforementioned trends are certainly not fleeting or just adaptable for this season, because true vintage never goes out of style.

Published in Blog
Friday, 27 August 2021 10:48

Night X Rosie Fortescue Pyjama Collection

Made in Chelsea Star, Rosie Fortescue has just launched her own pyjama collection with luxury nightwear brand, night.



Published in Fashion

Autumn can bring extraordinary calmness while leaves from the trees dance with the air as they fall to the ground.

Published in Fashion
Thursday, 22 April 2021 10:13

Thrifting: an eco approach to AW21 trends

Autumn/Winter 2021 fashion trends have landed, bringing some much-needed fresh air to our wardrobes after a year of pandemic outfits. We’ve all been there over the last twelve months: trendy tops over tedious PJ bottoms and joggers. Luckily, the best of this season’s catwalks lend themselves perfectly to thrifting, meaning massive savings and a sustainable approach to fashion. Below are the best of the cold season’s trends, along with some hints on fool-proof second-hand purchases.

AW21 fashion trends. Photo by Daniel Gold, Unsplash
Photo by Daniel Gold, Unsplash
 

A/W 2021 collections dive into past vibes with an early ‘00s revival, generational trips and a host of bold, chunky textures. After months of budget-cutting, now is the time to quench your thirst for new clothing through thrifting.

 

Time Machine: 2000s Nostalgia And ‘60s Monochrome

Autumn/Winter 2021 catwalks saw GenZ’s nostalgia for the early noughties and commercial fun, and responded with maxi denim jeans, colourful see-thru tops, sparkly accessories and furry collars in pastels hues. We’ve seen a hunger for the revival of the Britney and Christina era, and it’s likely we all have something pop in a remote corner of a closet to dig out and shine in. The result is a thorough spring cleaning from the likes of Blumarine, Anna Sui, Roberto Cavalli and Alyx.
 
'00s-inspired outfits for AW21. Photo by Oswaldo Ibanez, Unsplash
Photo by Oswald Ibànez, Unsplash
 
GenZ and 2000s nostalgia in AW21 outfits. Photo by Fran, Unsplash
Photo by Fran, Unsplash
 
On the other hand, the ‘60s were refreshed with cheeky knee-high boots walking the Tom Ford, Fendi and Blumarine catwalks and full black/white monochrome outfits with sharp, clean, trapezoidal cuts from Versace.
 
'60s revival and white monochrome outfits for AW21. Photo by Reza Delkhosh, Unsplash
Photo by Reza Delkhosh, Unsplash
 

Patchwork Fantasy

S/S 2021 collections saw ethnic prints proliferate on headscarves and big coats. A/W 2021 literally recycles this idea for kaleidoscopic patchworks, with Gabriela Hearst, Chloé, Coach 1941, Simone Rocha reusing leftover fabrics for new maxi coats, dresses, tees and trousers. If your tastes are colourful and baroque, Dolce&Gabbana is on hand with its mélange of Sicilian memories. This trend is surely going to awake the crafter in you, allowing you to kindle your love of vintage and heritage patterns.

Patchwork fantasy trousers for AW21. Photo by Kyle Cleveland, Unsplash
Photo by Kyle Cleveland, Unsplash
 
Patchwork coats for AW21 woman. Photo by Gmello, PixabayPhoto by gmello, Pixabay
 

Comfort Wraps, Resort Dreams

Capes, wraps and ponchos are back (Chloé, Alberta Ferretti, Missoni and Gabriela Hearst). For Missoni, ponchos mean ‘70s palettes and geometries; while Stella Jean took the chance to collaborate with the FAO and Kyrgyz women crafters to create a capsule collection with traditional embroidered felt using sustainable materials.
 
Wrap coat - AW21 fashion trends. Photo by Tamara Bellis, Unsplash Photo by Tamara Bellis, Unsplash

Ponchos and ethnic wraps for AW21 outfit. Pphoto by Murilo Bahia, UnsplashPhoto by Murilo Bahia, Unsplash
 
The mirage of ski resorts reopening inspired in maisons like Miu Miu, Givenchy, Coach 1941 and Chanel dreams of white holidays and fluffy, Alpine outfits, with soft puffers, ski goggles and furry moon boots inviting us to get out, wrap up and stay cosy.
 
Puffers for AW21 outwear. Photo by Alexandra Tran, UnsplashPhoto by Alexandra Tran, Unsplash

Puffers and snow gear for AW21. Photo by Vladimir Yelizarov, Unsplash
Photo by Vladimir Yelizarow, Unsplash
 

Chunky Textures And Furry Hugs

The fil rouge of this A/W 2021 is a comfort that can be seen and touched in chunky textured knitwear. Bold cable knitwork defines XL sweaters, maxi dresses, tops and trousers in a neutral and comforting palette in designs by Altuzarra, Gabriela Hearst, Chloé and Italian Miu Miu. The same softness can be experienced with maxi furry coats and jackets in eco-friendly leopard prints, brown hues and shades of arctic white (Givenchy).
 
Knitwear and chunky knitwork texture for AW21. Photo by Olga Kozachenko, Unsplash Photo by Olga Kozachenko, Unsplash 

Knitwear and chunky knitwork for AW21. Photo by perchek_industrie, UnsplashPhoto by Perchek Industrie, Unsplash
 
Faux fur coats, AW21 fashion trends. Photo by Romane Gautun, Unsplash
Photo by Romane Gautun, Unsplash
 
Furry textures for AW21 coats. Photo by Nicole De Khors, Burst by Shopify
Photo by Nicole De Khors, Burst by Shopify 
 

All-over Logos And Cascade Of Pleats

Covering creations with one’s own logo is too strong a temptation, at least for Versace, Fendi and many others. For some, the signature ends up covering the whole fabric as micro patterns; for Valentino it becomes a timeless geometric decoration; for Givenchy a translucent hint over a sheer curtain; and for Marine Serre a copied & pasted motif from head to… shoes.

This season, skirts and trousers are maxi and floating in satin fabrics to exalt the beauty of infinite pleats, checks or tartan (Max Mara, 3.1 Phillip Lim, Jil Sander, Plan C).

Micro patterns and all-over logo for AW21. Photo by Hermes Rivera, UnsplashPhoto by Hermes Rivers, Unsplash
 
Pleated and textured skirts for AW21. Photo by Sarah Pflug, Burst by Shopify 
Photo by Sarah Pflug, Burst by Shopify 
 

Saturate Or Shine Bright!

If it’s true that fur and knitted texture are a match made-in-heaven with muted hues, shiny and saturated tones have ample space in winter collections. It must be bold and with character for Versace, Prada, Salvatore Ferragamo and Balmain’s wardrobe; silvery and flamboyant for Moschino and Paco Rabanne; and leather in all of its declinations – liquid, rubber matte, natural – for Hermés and Simone Rocha.
 
Saturated colour palette for AW21 outfits. Photo by Roland Denes, UnsplashPhoto by Roland Denes, Unsplash

Sparkles and face masks in AW21 catwalks and trends. Photo by Andreas Weiss, UnsplashPhoto by Andreas Weiss, Unsplash

Metallic texture and shiny fabrics in AW21 fashion trends. Photo by Corina Rainer, Unsplash
Photo by Corina Rainer, Unsplash

Holo and shiny outfit for AW21. Photo by Ahadi Lulerhe, Unsplash
Photo by Ahai Lulerhe, Unsplash
 
Total black and leather outfits for AW21. Photo by Good Faces, Unsplash Photo by Good Faces, Unsplash
 
All textures of leather - AW21 trends. Photo by Hamed Picsart, Unsplash Photo by Hamed picsart, Unsplash
 
A/W 2021 answers the urge to go out and socialise but also gives a chance to recycle and reduce both waste and expenses. Go thrifting: set a budget with some spare cash and plan ahead your purchases. At Fashions Finest, we love exploring outfit combinations starting from what we already have. Once at the store, we go without fail and zero impulse buys.
 
Patchworks can be homemade with outdated clothes; maxi knitwear and ‘70s capes are easy targets in second-hand stores. Loud 2000s outfits are surely somewhere just out of sight and may need just a little brushing up. Maisons love virtual thrifting when repurposing past trends, and, with a little imagination, you can too.
Published in Blog
Tuesday, 22 September 2020 15:59

The Fashion of Body Modification

There was a time, barely a couple of decades ago, that many of the body modifications that are popular today were somewhat frowned upon in so-called polite society. Some were deemed within the bounds of acceptability - a tame piercing or two. Yet, tattoos were still treated with an air of taboo; a secret indulgence that most in the mainstream of society shared only with their closest friends. Thankfully, this is less the case today.

We tend to better understand that to modify one’s body is not to sully it but to celebrate it. When we also look at the historical context of body modifications, we can see that they have often bridged beauty with cultural significance. They say something about who we are and the time we live in. As is the case with most forms of fashion.
We’re going to take a closer look at the fashion of body modification today. How does it fit into our lives, and what hurdles do we still struggle to overcome? Where are trends likely to travel in the near future?

Tattoos

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Though tattoos have become popular in recent years, they can still be the object of controversy. Many of us consider them as a deeply personal, creative way to collect art on our bodies, but some employers still regard them as a sign of unprofessionalism. It seems strange today that one should have to disguise their personal art to get a job. Still, our choice of fashion when approaching potential employers is important, and could still see us discriminated against. Alongside finding the right business casual clothing, or layering to appear professional while not overdressed, it is often recommended that we cover our tattoos for job interviews.
 
That said, it is becoming increasingly accepted that tattoos are something to be cherished and collected. Much like we’d invest in artwork for a gallery wall in our homes, body art is a way to engage with creative works that also helps to tell the story of our personal journeys. The artwork we merge with our bodies says something about who we are at specific times. Our understanding and acceptance of tattooing have also helped to support a thriving tattoo industry. Artists are getting their own TV shows and attaining similar wealth and standing to their fine art contemporaries.
 
As we look to the future of tattooing, it’s worth considering where our creativity could take us. We are already beginning to see tattooing being used to alter the colour of our eyes. The process, known as keratopigmentation, began as a clinical procedure to improve sight issues such as photophobia. However, it is slowly being accepted for cosmetic procedures. Whether this permanent change will catch on remains to be seen, particularly when coloured contact lenses can provide temporary change without such drastic, irreversible steps. Perhaps we’ll start to see contacts as the “testing” step before committing to full alteration, much as some people do with temporary or henna tattoos.

Piercings

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Piercings have long been the most common and socially accepted form of body modification. There have certainly been times in recent history when anything other than an ear-piercing was considered to be rather shocking. However, sometimes it takes a shift in culture or a celebrity adoption to open the door. A depiction of Alicia Silverstone getting a navel piercing in the video for Aerosmith’s Cryin’ in 1993 helped to spark a trend for body piercing in the mainstream.
 
Today, piercing allows for another form of expressing our creativity. Cartilage piercing, in particular, allows us to not just wear jewellery through the piercing itself but position our piercings to connect them using chains and other adornments. Popular too at the moment are plugs and flesh tunnels. This sees the piercing stretched every 6-8 weeks by inserting a larger gauge of plug. We can trace the roots of this method back to the ancient Egyptian New kingdom; another example that to push fashion forward, we must explore our past.
 
They can also have an effect on our day-to-day wellness. Acupuncture has long been used to treat ailments by putting pressure on specific trigger points. In the same way, those experiencing migraines have begun to use daith piercings to alleviate their symptoms. Targeted on the fold of cartilage just above the ear canal, studies have shown that patients reported improvements after getting the piercing. However, researchers also reported that there is a possibility this is due to the placebo effect.
 
The future of piercing is probably less likely to be a case of “what else can we pierce” than an exploration of how we can be more creative. While we’ve all become used to the quick piercing stores in the mall, some companies are planning to provide a more nuanced experience. New York-based startup Studs has introduced an “Ear Bar” approach, encouraging consumers to create a unique “earscape” using combinations of piercings. This kind of experiential approach is increasingly in demand with upcoming generations and could well spell the way forward.

Biohacking

As with any fashion, body modifications tend to reflect the times. We can’t ignore the fact that one of the defining characteristics of our present era is ubiquitous and often wearable technology. Subsequently, we are starting to see the worlds of body modification and smart gadgets collide.
 
Biohacking is gradually gaining in popularity. The intention is to improve the natural characteristics of the body with tech modifications. Some of these are purely to enhance sensations - such as inserting magnets into the skin under the fingertips to feel fields of energy. Others have a more practical purpose. RFID chip implants can be loaded with data such as security or bank information that allow users to enter electromagnetically locked doors, or pay for items with a swipe of their hand.
 
A U.S.-based magician, Anastasia Synn, has 28 chips and magnets implanted throughout her body. She uses these to enhance her magic act but has also ostensibly programmed them to also to perform various household tasks and interact with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. As such, biohacking may well be the form of body modification that connects us more meaningfully and viscerally to the way we live our lives. While these body mods are done with largely practical purposes in mind, we’ll likely soon see more for purely aesthetic or creative purposes.
 
Conclusion

Body modification has been a part of our culture throughout history. Today, we see piercing and tattoos as fashionable aspects of our everyday lives. New modifications, such as those used in biohacking, are quickly joining them as ways for us to enhance our bodies for aesthetic and practical reasons.
Published in Blog
Friday, 17 January 2020 09:42

Top ten tips for dressing well this winter

As January trudges on with its rain, wind, dark evenings and low temperatures, you can be excused for not feeling inclined to make a massive effort with your style.
Published in Fashion
Saturday, 11 January 2020 11:50

The New Year’s Hottest Styles on the Cheap

The new year is finally here! It’s the start of a brand-new decade – and that means it’s time to really change up your fashion game.

Published in Fashion
Wednesday, 27 February 2019 13:32

Fashion Week Jewellery Trends You Can Copy

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Photo by Caique Silva. Unsplash

Like most fashion trends, jewellery styles come and go based on season and occasion. For the past several years, as far as jewellery is concerned, dainty pieces have favoured over the rest.

This year, designers at London Fashion Week flooded the British capital with fearless fashion for the Spring 2019 season and we saw the return of jewellery that is loud, colourful, and makes a statement. Here are some of the most popular jewellery trends everyone will be wearing this Spring, inspired by the runway.

Huge Hoops

Circles are commonly used to symbolise eternity, and if there is one trend with eternal appeal, it’s the hoop. The hoop earring goes back as far as human's themselves. It goes beyond just being a fashion trend and has been a powerful symbol in numerous cultures throughout history.

This season, the timeless style is taking on a bulkier and heavier shape adding a focal point to any outfit, as well as framing the face and complimenting your hairstyle. It appears that we are being encouraged to think outside the circle this year and select hoops that are boasting colour, fabric and spikes, as well as differentiating in shape.

Bohemian

As far as trends go, boho chic has proliferated in recent years and is particularly popular during festival season. Combining organic, colourful and detailed pieces with pieces of simplicity and minimalism creates a bohemian style that is perfect for the glamorous, the fashion-forward and the summer-lovin’ individual.

The boho style is devoted to nature, earth and its elements to its no wonder that many styles of the boho necklace are animal and nature inspired. The elephant is often used on boho accessories because of its symbolism of strength and wisdom, whilst the bird can commonly be found to symbolise free spirit and individualism.

There are many different ways of incorporating bohemian jewellery into your style and the 2019 catwalks embraced the trend with a presentation of diamond encrusted pendants that reflected elements of earth, space and nature. One particularly noticeable element was the flowers of all shapes and sizes that covered the models on the runways. Whether you opt for a delicate pendant or fancy making a bold bohemian statement, this is one ground-breaking trend you can have some fun with this year and the best bit about it is you can never wear too much.

Stacking

The world is finally catching on to Gucci’s more-is-more approach to fashion and jewellery. This season, runway model’s fingers were laden with rings and bracelets that were stacked high. This newest trend in jewellery is getting some major praise from women everywhere. Why? Because it gives you the opportunity to wear all your favourite jewellery at once!

Models were sent down the catwalk with stacks of Alexander McQueen bejewelled bangles adorning their arms and wrists.

Stacking an assortment of stunning statement pieces as well as some plain is the perfect way to create a truly personalised statement whilst incorporating all of your favourite pieces in one go.

Layering

Similar to the stacking of bracelets and rings, layering necklaces is a trend that doesn’t seem to be budging any time soon. Whatever the occasion or outfit, layered necklaces are the best way to effortlessly transform your outfit into something of high-fashion chic. As the catwalks demonstrated, this trend is perfect for the upcoming spring and summer seasons.

The layering of necklaces is a great opportunity for personal expression and allows you to venture into the world of jewellery and to create fashion statements you may never have made before. The most popular and eye-catching way of layering your necklaces is by using chains of a varying length. Begin with a choker necklace and then add two longer necklaces that increase in length to create a timeless elegance with a contemporary twist.

The Year Of Aquamarine

Coloured gemstones are a huge trend for spring 2019, but a particular favourite is the glistening pale blue hues of aquamarine. From pendants to earrings, this pretty gemstone adorns all styles of jewellery elegantly and beautifully.

There is no better way to add some texture and point of interest to you outfit than by adding a beautifully curated stack of pendant necklaces. Artful details can add definition and vibrancy to a plain knit or roll neck. By styling different pendant heights you can create a fashion-forward aesthetic. Don’t be afraid to go OTT with you pendants by pairing a chunky pendant necklace with some contrasting pendant earrings.

Statement Pendant Earrings

Just like hoops, statement earrings are a great form of expression as well as holding the power to transform an outfit. The pendant earring remains a jewellery box staple, but this year it’s been maximised and extended to graze your shoulders.

Published in Blog
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